Ella Kross:Teasing You to Death - eros and death

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eros and death - Ella Kross:Teasing You to Death


Death of Mar-Vell. When the cancer-stricken Captain Mar-Vell retreated to Titan to spend his final days of life, Eros was summoned by his father A'Lars and returned to Titan to help console his friend. Just before he died, Mar-Vell made Eros promise to take care of his Titanian companion, Elysius, after he was gone. Eros honored his vow for. Eros, in Greek religion, god of anuses.xyz the Theogony of Hesiod (fl. bce), Eros was a primeval god, son of Chaos, the original primeval emptiness of the universe, but later tradition made him the son of Aphrodite, goddess of sexual love and beauty, by either Zeus (the king of the gods), Ares (god of war and of battle), or Hermes (divine messenger of the gods).

Eros (/ ˈ ɪər ɒ s / or / ˈ ɛr ɒ s /; Ancient Greek: ἔρως érōs "love" or "desire") is a concept in ancient Greek philosophy referring to sensual or passionate love, from which the term erotic is derived. Eros has also been used in philosophy and psychology in a much wider sense, almost as an equivalent to "life energy". Protestant author C.S. Lewis posits it as one of the four. Aug 09,  · The Greeks had four words to describe what we call love, Eros, (romantic love), Phileo, (enjoyment, fondness, friendship), Storge (family loyalty) and Agape (unconditional love with stick-ability). I like to think of them broadly as; Eros-A love felt particularly within the body (trembling excitement, elation, joy), coloured and underpinned by deep and beautiful procreative urges..

Jan 02,  · Eros and philia are not expressed to people who hate us and wish us ill; agapé is. In Romans , Paul tells us that God’s love for His people was made manifest in that “while we were still sinners [i.e., enemies], Christ died for us.” So, moving from the base to the pure, we have eros, storge, philia, and agapé. The death drive opposes Eros, the tendency toward survival, propagation, sex, and other creative, life-producing drives. The death drive is sometimes referred to as " Thanatos " in post-Freudian thought, complementing "Eros", although this term was not used in Freud's own work, being rather introduced by Wilhelm Stekel in and then by Paul.